Popular Winning Film Composer, Ennio Morricone Dies At 91

Ennio Morricone, the Oscar-winning Italian film composer, has died at the age of 91.
The Italian musician, who is credited for his work on more than 400 films and TV shows, died on Monday, July 6, at the Campus Bio-Medico in Rome, a week after suffering a fall in which he broke his femur.


His death was confirmed by his lawyer, Giorgio Assumma, who also disclosed that Morricone requested a private funeral.
Morricone began his career as a trumpet player before switching to film composition in 1961.
He created music for more than 70 award-winning movies, including “Once Upon a Time in the West ” and “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” which earned him a spot in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2009. He also won an Academy Award for his soundtrack for Quentin Tarantino’s “The Hateful Eight” in 2016.
Other films he scored include The Thing (directed by John Carpenter), Cinema Paradiso (Giuseppe Tornatore), The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo), Days of Heaven (Terrence Malick), The Untouchables (Brian de Palma) and the La Cage aux Folles trilogy (Édouard Molinaro).
Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte paid tribute to the composer on Monday, writing on Twitter: “We will always remember, with infinite gratitude, the artistic genius of the Maestro #EnnioMorricone.”
“It made us dream, move, reflect, writing memorable notes that will remain unforgettable in the history of music and cinema” he added.
Italian President Sergio Mattarella offered condolences to the family of the “distinguished” artist.
“Both a refined and popular musician, he has left a deep mark in the history of music in the second part of the 20th century,” he said. “Through his soundtracks, he has greatly contributed in spreading and reinforcing Italy’s prestige around the world.”